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"Estate planning"

Estate planning is the creation of a definite plan for managing your wealth while you are alive and distributing it after your death. These assets may be owned by you separately or jointly with others.
Estate planning is the preservation and the distribution of your assets, both during your life and upon your death. It is accomplishing your personal and family goals and easing the management of your financial and legal affairs, as well as minimizing taxes if your estate is large enough for taxes to be of concern. When we talk about an estate, we mean all assets of any value that you own, including real property, business interests, investments, insurance proceeds, personal property and even your personal effects. An estate planning generally, refers to the means by which your estate is passed on to your loved ones on your death. Estate planning can be accomplished through a variety of methods, including:


•    Revocable Living Trusts
•    Last Will and Testament / Probate   
•    Lifetime Gifting
•    Joint Ownership
•    Beneficiary Designations
•    Life Estates


Problems often arise when people don't coordinate all of these methods of passing on their estate. If you have a well-drafted estate plan in place, you will ensure that your estate passes to whom you want, when you want, and is carried out in the manner you've chosen. You can rest assured that your family won't have to endure the public process and costly matter of probate. The government won't be able to take what you've spent a lifetime building. But you need to be aware of the many options that exist in estate planning - and you must choose your estate planning attorney wisely.

We want you to feel confident about the choices you make - let us be your guide on the path toward preserving your family's future.

 

Retirement Plans and Estate Planning

At first glance, the concept of Individual Retirement Accounts (IRA), 401(k)s and other retirement plans seems simple enough: A structured way to save for your golden years while deferring taxes on your growing nest egg. Unfortunately, that simple idea becomes one of the most complex areas of estate planning once IRS rules are applied.